Blenheim Park Lodge 8981

History

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The name of the Lodge was derived from the estate of the Peacock family originally situated in Feltham Middlesex. The estate which remained in the Peacock's family ownership for nearly 200 years consisted of a Manor House standing in its own grounds a farm and a dairy which in its heyday supported a thriving rural community. 


Sadly, over the years through pressures of urban development the grounds and farm lands were gradually sold off and eventually in the late 1920's the house, farm, dairy and remaining lands were finally sold for redevelopment. 
Substantial urban development then took place on the original land of Blenheim Park to include the Feltham Sports Arena, the Railway station and The Feltham Ex-Servicemen's Club.

In the late seventies the Secretary of that ex serviceman's club was Donald Woodruff, commonly known as Jock. Jock had the idea of forming a new masonic Lodge from the members of that ex serviceman's club and naming it after Blenheim Park on whose original grounds the club stood. Jock being a well known local builder promoted the idea with local businessmen to include the local newsagent, Harold Abbott, William Gibbs managing director of J Gibbs garage one of the oldest businesses in Bedfont originally started by his grandfather John in 1844 as a blacksmith & wheelwright. William Gibbs then put Jock in touch with Desmond Groves a well known local freemason who had been instrumental in forming the Bedfont Lodge which eventually became our sponsoring Lodge.

These four principals formed a working party and Blenheim Park was finally consecrated in 1981 with Desmond Groves and Donald Lympany becoming the two founding Provincial Grand officers.

The crest of Blenheim Park commemorates its origins and shows the original Manor house with one of the members of the Peacock family as well as a fanning peacock, as for many years wild peacocks roamed free in Bedfont, still commemorated today by two yew trees shaped to represent two peacocks in St Mary's churchyard, Bedfont. 

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Approved by

United Grand

Lodge of England


 

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